Memories of Tango

by | Oct 21, 2007

I think tango and I think of women. I think tango and I think of Perón. Let me explain: as a child I used to hear tangos sung by our maid, a woman who had left the pampa to come down to the city, and whose political leanings were the exact opposite of those of my parents. Justa was a fervent peronista. Thanks to Perón she had discovered that she could be more than a maid. My mother let her have two afternoons off a week so that she could attend the School of Nursing founded by Evita. I remember how good she looked the day she graduated, decked in her brand-new blue uniform, which she then hung carefully in her closet and put her white apron back on. But this is only indirectly related to tango. During Perón’s first term in office nationalism was the order of the day and radio stations were made to broadcast national music. National music meant the music of the provinces but it meant, above all, tango. Tango was so national that tango orchestras were called orquestas típicas—“typical” orchestras. Justa cleaned the house to the beat of tangos played on the radio and would sing along while I followed around. I remember Zorro Gris, for example, “Grey Fox”, a characteristically misogynist tango where a man accuses the woman who’s left him of having a soul so cold she cannot warm it with her grey fox wrap. Perhaps I remember it because my mother also had a grey fox wrap, and the dissecated fox’s head, lying between her breasts, both disturbed and fascinated me. But all this had little to do with Justa, who sang while she pushed a very heavy brush along the oak floors to make them shine. I learnt words: percanta, bulín, gil, words that I knew not to repeat before my parents, aware that neither Justa nor I would benefit from this vaunting of new knowledge. Justa also sang a tango that went “Su nombre era Margot, / llevaba boina azul, / y en su pecho colgaba una cruz.” I liked that tango because my mother’s name was Margot. Justa liked it, I suspect, because it afforded her the perverse pleasure of shouting out my mother’s given name instead of the usually diffident “Señora.” Tango, the language of tango, was the voice of resistance. I identified with Justa but never learned the words to any one tango, just fragments. Every now and then I recite them to myself, use them as a charm that does not necessarily ward off evil but brings pleasure, much in the same way I turn to stray verses from Racine, memorized roughly at the same time. These are literary luxuries: they comfort me.

I think tango and I think of the woman who taught me to dance it. “She knows how to lead,” people said admiringly of my aunt. Leading was crucial to tango and role playing essential. My father, who was a bad dancer, did not know how to lead and seemed not to care. My aunt, instead, moved with incredible dexterity, leading the body of her partner with the lightest of touches. She was able to make her partner’s body—mine, on the occasion—do, as if by its own initiative, whatever she wanted it to do.

It is curious that in a dance with such specific roles—the leader, the one that is led—there is so much gender instability. This is not just my perception: any critical study of tango mentions these gender oddities. At the beginning tango was supposedly a dance between men. As such, scholars suggest—perhaps not wanting to consider other discomfiting possibilities—it was the enactment of a duel in which the more daring man won the lead. Sexuality is only recognized when tango goes heterosocial: then, instead of being a contest between lowlifes, it becomes a scene of seduction between a man and a woman. Yet the homosocial nature of tango never quite disappears. Salacious postcards of the twenties often show scantily-clad women dancing a tango together. Films contribute their bit: think of the immensely seductive tango danced by Dominique Sanda and Stefania Sandrelli in Bertolucci’s The Conformist or, for that matter, in the transvestite, parodic tango performed by Jack Lemmon and Joe Brown in Some Like It Hot.

I think tango and I think of certain women’s voices, like the voice of Olga Orozco, the poet, who, like the “Malena,” celebrated in the tango by that name, knew how to sing tangos como ninguna, like no one else. Olga’s version of “Sur,” sung in her low-pitched, smoky voice, gave one the shivers. I think too of the long tradition of female tango singers I discovered as an adult, starting out with Azucena Maizani and Rosita Quiroga, continuing with Ada Falcón, Libertad Lamarque, Tita Merello, and still alive in Susana Rinaldi and Adriana Varela. Even in those cases—or perhaps especially in those cases—tango showed its ambiguous streak, its tendency to transvestism, to provocative sexual confusion. These women, some, in fact, in drag—Azucena Maizani often performed dressed like a neighborhood tough—physically took over the male “I” singing the lyrics. But tango’s transvestite effects do not need an actual change of dress. Simple linguistic transvestism does it just as well, operating the twist, the gender crisscrossing through a repossessed first person. The primal scene of tango, its mourning and melancholy, stages a male “I” mourning the absence of a woman who has left him for a richer lover or a more glamorous life. But when that “I” is embodied by a woman, a woman who mourns the loss of another woman and sings her desperate love to her not imitating male diction but in her own voice, tango fully reveals its complexity, its infinite seduction.

I have said that I only remember fragments of tangos. But Argentines, even those of us who did not grow up dancing or singing tangos, casually quote them when we speak, not really knowing what tango we’re quoting from. “Veinte años no es nada,” “Twenty years is nothing,” a line sung by Gardel, has passed into language. Argentines speak through tango, or rather we “speak tango”: “cuesta abajo en la rodada,” “no habrá más penas ni olvido.” Tango belongs to what Borges calls our “slight mnemonic archive,” a random collection to which we refer, seriously or in jest, and more often than not seriously and in jest. Borges wrote somewhere that the tango “Loca” touched him more than the national anthem. My mother used to say she wanted “La Cumparsita” played at her funeral.

A friend of mine—to go back to women—suffers from Alzheimer’s and seldom speaks these days but she remembers bits of tango. If I say to her “Veinte años no es nada” she joins in, without missing a beat, as if waking from a dream, “que febril la mirada errante en las sombras te busca y te nombra.” She doesn’t remember her mother’s name or what she had for lunch ten minutes ago but tango has the power to bring her back.

Recuerdos de Tango

Por Sylvia Molloy

Pienso tango y pienso mujeres. Pienso tango y pienso Perón. Me explico: de chica le oía cantar tangos a la sirvienta que teníamos en casa, una mujer que había dejado el campo para venir a la ciudad y cuyas simpatías políticas eran diametralmente opuestas a las de mis padres. Era peronista, con fervor, y Perón le había permitido ver que podía ser algo más que sirvienta. Mi madre le daba dos tardes libres para que cursara estudios en la Escuela de Enfermeras que había fundado Eva Perón. Recuerdo que me puse contenta cuando la vi el día en que se recibió, con su flamante uniforme azul que después colgó prolijamente en el ropero para volver a ponerse el delantal blanco que usaba en casa. Pero esto no viene al caso sino indirectamente. Durante el primer gobierno de Perón, agresivamente nacionalista, las radioemisoras tenían orden de transmitir un porcentaje elevado—acaso fuera el 70%—de música nacional. Era música nacional la música de las provincias, las cuecas, las vidalitas, los chamamés, las zambas, pero sobre todo era música nacional el tango, tan nacional que las orquestas que lo tocaban se llamaban “orquestas típicas”. Justa, que así se llamaba, limpiaba las habitaciones al compás de la radio y la radio tocaba tangos cuyas letras sabía de memoria y acompañaba con voz sonora y competente. Recuerdo los títulos, algunos versos: “Zorro Gris”, por ejemplo, tango característicamente misógino en el que un hombre le canta a una mujer “de la vida” que vanamente busca abrigar “el intenso frío de tu alma” con su lujoso abrigo de zorro gris. Creo que lo recuerdo porque mi madre también tenía un zorro gris cuya cabeza reseca, sobre su pecho, me intranquilizaba y a la vez fascinaba. Pero también creo que el tango me desconcertaba porque a menudo le oía decir a mi padre que había que cuidarse de los zorros grises y no hablaba de animales, ni de abrigos, sino de inspectores de tránsito: así se los llamaba entonces, acaso tuvieran uniformes grises, no recuerdo. Todas estas asociaciones le eran ajenas a Justa que cantaba mientras pasaba un pesado cepillo de lustrar pisos. A veces (cuando mi madre no estaba) se sentaba en un sillón, en una cama: descansaba y seguía cantando. Aprendí palabras: percanta, bulín, chamuyo, gil, palabras que me cuidaba de repetir ante mis padres, sabiendo que no saldríamos bien paradas ni Justa ni yo. También le oía cantar “Adiós Pampa mía”, tango tardío de Hugo del Carril, del cual mi madre decía que no era de veras tango, aunque sospecho que lo decía porque del Carril era peronista. Y también cantaba un tango que decía “Su nombre era Margot, llevaba boina azul, y en su pecho colgaba una cruz”, que probablemente le gustaba a Justa, entre otras cosas, porque perversamente le permitía pronunciar el nombre de pila de mi madre (que también se llamaba Margot y a quien mi padre solía cantarle ese tango para hacerla rabiar). Por intermedio del tango Justa podía tutear a mi madre, decirle Margot y no “Señora”. El tango, el lenguaje del tango era música de protesta, de resistencia. Simpaticé con Justa y sus tangos pero nunca aprendí entera una letra de tango, sólo fragmentos. Aún los recuerdo, me los recito de vez en cuando, como talismán gratuito que no necesariamente protege pero del que se echa mano, como echo mano a veces de los versos de Racine, aprendidos por la misma época. Son lujos literarios: reconfortan.

Pienso tango y pienso en otra mujer que me enseñó a bailarlo. “Sabía llevar”, decían elogiosamente de mi tía, cualidad no desdeñable en un baile donde el role playing es particularmente importante. Mi padre, mal bailarín, no sabía llevar y no parecía importarle demasiado. Mi tía en cambio se manejaba con admirable destreza, sabía guiar el cuerpo de quien bailara con ella con levísimos toques que, más que contactos eran insinuaciones. Conseguía que ese cuerpo—en la ocasión el mío—hiciera lo que ella quería, con toda naturalidad, como por voluntad propia.

Es curioso que en un baile con papeles tan explícitos—el que lleva el que se deja llevar—se crucen y confundan tanto los géneros; no sólo en mi anécdota sino en cualquier reflexión sobre el tango. Baile entre hombres al comienzo, el tango habría sido, dicen los especialistas—acaso para no contemplar otras posibilidades—la escenificación de un duelo, una puja masculina para demostrar que se es más valiente que el otro. Sólo se admite la sexualidad en el tango cuando entra a formar parte de la pareja la mujer: entonces deja de ser pleito malevo, se torna escena de seducción y de dominio. No desaparece por ello el carácter homosocial: abundan las postales provocadoras de los años veinte con dos mujeres, livianamente vestidas, bailando un tango. El cine aportará lo suyo: piénsese en el estilizado tango magistral que bailan Dominique Sanda y Stefania Sandrelli en El Conformista de Bertolucci. O, en modo paródico y travestido, en el tango que bailan Jack Lemmon y Joe Brown en Some Like It Hot.

Pienso tango y pienso en ciertas voces de mujer. Pienso en voces queridas, como la de Olga Orozco, poeta argentina, quien como Malena sabía cantar tangos como ninguna, y cuya versión de Sur (“paredón y después”), cantada con su bajo ronco de fumadora, daba escalofrío. Pienso en la larga tradición de cantantes de tango mujeres que escuché de adulta, en la serie que empieza con Azucena Maizani y Rosita Quiroga, sigue con Ada Falcón, Libertad Lamarque, Mercedes Simone, Tita Merello, y llega hasta Susana Rinaldi y Adriana Varela. También en estos casos mostraba su hilacha ambigua el tango, su tendencia al travestismo, a la provocadora y estimulante confusión sexual. Estas mujeres, algunas de hecho con ropa de hombre—Azucena Maizani cantando “Milonga del 900” vestida de compadrito, con pañuelo blanco al cuello y chambergo ladeado—se encarnaban en el yo masculino que cantaba la historia. Pero el efecto travestido no necesita, de hecho, cambio de indumentaria: un simple travestismo gramatical opera la torsión, los complejos cruces de género, extrañamente seductores. La escena primal del tango, su duelo y melancolía, presenta a un yo masculino que llora la ausencia de la mujer que lo ha dejado por un pretendiente más rico, o porque prefiere los vanos lujos de la vida fácil, o, simplemente porque se ha cansado de él. Cantadas no por un hombre sino por una mujer, una mujer que se lamenta del abandono y le canta su amor desesperado a otra mujer, el tango revela plenamente su infinita complejidad, su ambigüedad genérica, su seducción.

He dicho que del tango sólo tengo fragmentos de letras, escenas, dichos. Los argentinos, aun quienes no nos criamos bailando o cantando tangos, y acaso por ello mismo, citamos frases de tangos al hablar, como al descuido, a menudo sin saber a qué pieza pertenecen. “Veinte años no es nada” se ha vuelto frase común desde que Gardel la cantó por primera vez. Hablamos a través del tango o “hablamos tango”: “che papusa”, “verás que todo es mentira”, “vida mía, lejos más te quiero”, “mano a mando hemos quedado”, “cuesta abajo en la rodada”, “como juega el gato maula con el mísero ratón”, ‘no habrá más penas ni olvido”. El tango, digo, es materia de cita, forma parte de lo que Borges llamaría un “leve archivo mnemónico”, un arbitrario conjunto compartido al que se recurre, ya en broma, ya en serio, y habitualmente las dos cosas a la vez. Borges escribe por los años veinte que lo conmueve más oir el tango “Loca” que el Himno Nacional. Mi tía, cuando mi madre se arreglaba para salir con su entonces novio, mi padre, le cantaba “Ibas linda como un sol / se paraban pa’ mirarte”, de Confesión, para irritarla. Mi madre, a su vez, decía que cuando muriera quería que tocaran “La comparsita” en el entierro.

Una amiga mía—para seguir con las mujeres—sufre de Alzheimers y ha perdido la mayor parte de la memoria. Sorprendentemente, o quizá no tanto, recuerda fragmentos de tango. Si le digo “veinte años no es nada”, sin un instante de duda, como si despertara de un sueño, empalma: “que febril la mirada errante en las sombras te busca y te nombra”. No recuerda cómo se llamaba la madre ni qué ha comido para el almuerzo pero, en esos momentos en que tararea antes de sumirse en su silencio habitual, creo que es feliz.

Pienso tango y pienso en otra mujer que me enseñó a bailarlo. “Sabía llevar”, decían elogiosamente de mi tía, cualidad no desdeñable en un baile donde el role playing es particularmente importante. Mi padre, mal bailarín, no sabía llevar y no parecía importarle demasiado. Mi tía en cambio se manejaba con admirable destreza, sabía guiar el cuerpo de quien bailara con ella con levísimos toques que, más que contactos eran insinuaciones. Conseguía que ese cuerpo—en la ocasión el mío—hiciera lo que ella quería, con toda naturalidad, como por voluntad propia.

Es curioso que en un baile con papeles tan explícitos—el que lleva el que se deja llevar—se crucen y confundan tanto los géneros; no sólo en mi anécdota sino en cualquier reflexión sobre el tango. Baile entre hombres al comienzo, el tango habría sido, dicen los especialistas—acaso para no contemplar otras posibilidades—la escenificación de un duelo, una puja masculina para demostrar que se es más valiente que el otro. Sólo se admite la sexualidad en el tango cuando entra a formar parte de la pareja la mujer: entonces deja de ser pleito malevo, se torna escena de seducción y de dominio. No desaparece por ello el carácter homosocial: abundan las postales provocadoras de los años veinte con dos mujeres, livianamente vestidas, bailando un tango. El cine aportará lo suyo: piénsese en el estilizado tango magistral que bailan Dominique Sanda y Stefania Sandrelli en El Conformista de Bertolucci. O, en modo paródico y travestido, en el tango que bailan Jack Lemmon y Joe Brown en Some Like It Hot.

Pienso tango y pienso en ciertas voces de mujer. Pienso en voces queridas, como la de Olga Orozco, poeta argentina, quien como Malena sabía cantar tangos como ninguna, y cuya versión de Sur (“paredón y después”), cantada con su bajo ronco de fumadora, daba escalofrío. Pienso en la larga tradición de cantantes de tango mujeres que escuché de adulta, en la serie que empieza con Azucena Maizani y Rosita Quiroga, sigue con Ada Falcón, Libertad Lamarque, Mercedes Simone, Tita Merello, y llega hasta Susana Rinaldi y Adriana Varela. También en estos casos mostraba su hilacha ambigua el tango, su tendencia al travestismo, a la provocadora y estimulante confusión sexual. Estas mujeres, algunas de hecho con ropa de hombre—Azucena Maizani cantando “Milonga del 900” vestida de compadrito, con pañuelo blanco al cuello y chambergo ladeado—se encarnaban en el yo masculino que cantaba la historia. Pero el efecto travestido no necesita, de hecho, cambio de indumentaria: un simple travestismo gramatical opera la torsión, los complejos cruces de género, extrañamente seductores. La escena primal del tango, su duelo y melancolía, presenta a un yo masculino que llora la ausencia de la mujer que lo ha dejado por un pretendiente más rico, o porque prefiere los vanos lujos de la vida fácil, o, simplemente porque se ha cansado de él. Cantadas no por un hombre sino por una mujer, una mujer que se lamenta del abandono y le canta su amor desesperado a otra mujer, el tango revela plenamente su infinita complejidad, su ambigüedad genérica, su seducción.

He dicho que del tango sólo tengo fragmentos de letras, escenas, dichos. Los argentinos, aun quienes no nos criamos bailando o cantando tangos, y acaso por ello mismo, citamos frases de tangos al hablar, como al descuido, a menudo sin saber a qué pieza pertenecen. “Veinte años no es nada” se ha vuelto frase común desde que Gardel la cantó por primera vez. Hablamos a través del tango o “hablamos tango”: “che papusa”, “verás que todo es mentira”, “vida mía, lejos más te quiero”, “mano a mando hemos quedado”, “cuesta abajo en la rodada”, “como juega el gato maula con el mísero ratón”, ‘no habrá más penas ni olvido”. El tango, digo, es materia de cita, forma parte de lo que Borges llamaría un “leve archivo mnemónico”, un arbitrario conjunto compartido al que se recurre, ya en broma, ya en serio, y habitualmente las dos cosas a la vez. Borges escribe por los años veinte que lo conmueve más oir el tango “Loca” que el Himno Nacional. Mi tía, cuando mi madre se arreglaba para salir con su entonces novio, mi padre, le cantaba “Ibas linda como un sol / se paraban pa’ mirarte”, de Confesión, para irritarla. Mi madre, a su vez, decía que cuando muriera quería que tocaran “La comparsita” en el entierro.

Una amiga mía—para seguir con las mujeres—sufre de Alzheimers y ha perdido la mayor parte de la memoria. Sorprendentemente, o quizá no tanto, recuerda fragmentos de tango. Si le digo “veinte años no es nada”, sin un instante de duda, como si despertara de un sueño, empalma: “que febril la mirada errante en las sombras te busca y te nombra”. No recuerda cómo se llamaba la madre ni qué ha comido para el almuerzo pero, en esos momentos en que tararea antes de sumirse en su silencio habitual, creo que es feliz.

Fall 2007Volume VII, Number 1
Sylvia Molloy is Albert Schweitzer Professor of Humanities at New York University. She is currently working on a book on homecoming narratives and writing a new novel.

Related Articles

Brazilian Breakdancing

When you think about breakdancing, images of kids popping, locking, and wind-milling, hand- standing, shoulder-rolling, and hand-jumping, might come to mind. And those kids might be city kids dancing in vacant lots and playgrounds. Now, New England kids of all classes and cultures are getting a chance to practice break-dancing in their school gyms and then go learn about it in a teaching unit designed by Veronica …

Dance Revolution: Creating Global Citizens in the Favelas of Rio

Dance Revolution: Creating Global Citizens in the Favelas of Rio

Yolanda Demétrio stares out the window of our public bus in Rio de Janeiro, on our way to visit her dance colleagues at Rio’s avant-garde cultural center, Fundição Progresso. Yolanda is a 37-year-old dance teacher, homeowner, social entrepreneur and former favela (Brazilian urban shantytown) resident. She is the founder and director of Espaço Aberto (Open Space), an organization through which Yolanda has nearly …

Disruption in the Immigrant Experience: Colombian Youth Dance Their Way to Continuity

Disruption in the Immigrant Experience: Colombian Youth Dance Their Way to Continuity

Imagine you are fifteen years old. As an immigrant who has lived in the United States for a few years, you are still trying to find your place. You decide to join a group that dances the traditional dances of your country. You practice every week on Fridays, when you could be going to the movies or hanging out with your friends. Your goal is to perform in that big annual show a lot of people have told you about. That day has finally …

Print Friendly, PDF & Email