Making A Difference: Connecting the Diaspora with Caribbean NGOs

by | Oct 28, 2007

Photo by Elizabeth Langosy.

​E.One.Caribbean, an initiative based at LASPAU, seeks to engage the Caribbean diaspora in reinvigorating their home countries by providing financial, volunteer, and capacity-building resources to NGOs whose work addresses the social problems that threaten long-term economic and cultural viability.

The program was developed by Norris Prevost—a longtime member of the Parliament of Dominica and recent graduate of the Mason Fellows MPA/Midcareer Program at the Kennedy School of Government (KSG)—in conjunction with fellow KSG social enterprise students. An initial series of workshops held in Dominica, Saint Lucia, and Saint Vincent drew representatives from nearly one hundred NGOs interested in working with E.One.Caribbean, including the Windward Islands Farmers Association, the St. Vincent National Council of Women, the St. Lucia Medical and Dental Association, and the Peace Corps in Dominica. In addition, a Harvard University senior, Daniel Littlejohn-Carrillo, was awarded a KSG Institute of Politics Director’s Internship to spend the summer of 2007 interning with Prevost at the Dominica Parliament to further the goals of E.One.Caribbean.

Fall 2007Volume VII, Number 1

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