To Dance or to Box

The Struggle of San Basilio de Palenque

by | Apr 22, 2012

Children learn to box from an early age in San Basilio de Palenque. Photos by Andres Sanin.

 

It’s Sunday, the streets are dusty and the only arrivals to San Basilio de Palenque are some motorcycle-taxis and an old bus from the village of La María. Peddlers descend from the taxis with handmade sweets, tropical fruits or cheap Chinese sunglasses to sell on the beaches of Cartagena. The colorful bus often carries a group of tourists who come to see amapalé dance show. Public buses drive by without taking the unpaved road that leads to the heart of San Basilio in northern Colombia. In the central plaza three things stand out: a chapel painted in pastel colors, a soccer field and the sculpture of a figure that stretches its manacled hands out to the sky. It is Benkos Biohó, a runaway slave who established this maroon community. In San Basilio, just about every palenquero (blacks of Bantú, Kikongo or Kimbundú ancestry) knows his name, yet he is virtually unknown to most Colombians.

What is known to most Colombians and in the world beyond is that this village of 3,500 has produced at least three world champion boxers, the most famous probably being Antonio Cervantes—Kid Pambelé. But the story of San Basilio as a cradle of champions is inextricably intertwined with its struggle with freedom.
 
That history of struggle began when Benkos, the Prince of Guinea Bissau, was kidnapped by Portuguese slave traffickers and sold to Alonso del Campo in 1596. On the way to Cartagena the boat sank in the Magdalena River. He escaped to Montes de María and became the leader of the Cimarron resistance movement, whose members would settle in San Basilio de Palenque. Many consider Palenque as the first freed territory of America, one that UNESCO crowned with the flamboyant title of “Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity” in 2005. However, neither Palenque nor Biohó received much attention during the commemoration of the Latin American bicentennial of independence. Few people remembered how Benkos died heroically as a martyr when the Spanish governor of Cartagena betrayed the terms of the peace treaty that he had signed. That’s why the tourists still ask who is that nude black man in bronze and chains reaching for the sky.
 
Despite the town’s deficiencies (there is no sewer system, for example), the population keeps expanding because of the arrival of displaced peasants from Montes de María—victims of a long and never ending conflict among paramilitaries, guerrillas and the state. The palenqueros don’t want to be involved in politics. In San Basilio the atmosphere is peaceful and the only sound is that of champeta, beating a catchy rhythm that animates the streets. San Basilio—often called just “Palenque”—carries a long history of oppression, misery and colonial violence, but the town receives the foreign tourists with the festive music of the picos (mobile speakers) and the joyful dancing of a mother lulling her little twins. Behind a fence, in the public school grounds, boys and girls play soccer. Some pose for the camera, showing their fists in boxing positions. The youthful boxing tradition arose from the military society that the villagers had to develop to fend off the Spaniards (a fact immortalized in Marlon Brando’s film Burn!). The community became a kind of Afro-American Sparta. As soon as they could walk, boys and girls were trained in the martial arts.
 
On the other side of the soccer field is a boxing gym that Coldeportes, the national sports agency, inaugurated in 2007, practically a palace among poor houses and only comparable to the new cultural center constructed by the Ministry of Culture. Inside hangs a large portrait of Kid Pambelé, a palenquero who went from being a bootblack to becoming the most famous black boxer of Colombia, when on October 28, 1978 in Panama City he knocked out Peppermint Frazer and won the world championship title in the light welterweight category (140 pounds).
 
In the 1970s, two other world boxing champions from Palenque also brought national attention and pride to San Basilio: the Cardona brothers, Ricardo and Prudencio, in the divisions of bantamweight and flyweight, respectively. Palenque’s Rodrigo “Rocky” Valdes also held both the WBC and WBA middleweight crowns at various times between 1974 and 1978. Nevertheless, Kid Pambelé alone kept the world championship for eight years, defending the title in 21 fights. He became a close friend of President Misael Pastrana Borrero, whom he brought to San Basilio for a historic visit, along with the public electricity and water supply its residents had been awaiting for so long. On Christmas of that year the saint of devotion was no longer San Basilio (the same San Nicholas who inspired Christmas), but San Kid Pambelé, delivering the greatest gift the town had ever received. According to Colombian journalist Juan Gossaín, the cult of the Kid is explained by the fact that he taught Colombians that winning was possible in a country of losers, where people often celebrated failure because of near victories.
 
This was that same frightened, insecure and weak boxer whom his first trainer had called the Black Threat. This fighter once placed a bet against himself in a fight with such bad luck that his opponent had done the same thing, so he threw himself to the ground first without having received the slightest scratch. After the discredit following such a loser trick, the iron discipline and even the hard words of his trainer were fruitful. According to journalist Eugenio Baena, trainer Ramiro Machado, seeing that his pupil was not reacting during a fight, used to insult him with racial epithets, adding “You will always be a slave if you don’t win this fight.” Pambelé says the cursing from his mulato trainer didn’t bother him, but rather spurred him on. Nevertheless, we have to wonder if such insults, used again and again since colonial times to destroy self-confidence and self-esteem, were what threw him from glory to the obscurity of drugs and addiction.
 
Today our Kid struggles between an image of himself as Antonio Cervantes, former world champion and father of at least 11 children, and a hallucinated version of “The Black Threat” who harms himself and his family. In the national imaginary and the archives of YouTube and the electronic media, the images of some of his 44 knockouts coexist with those in which you can see him punching the wind. A man of very few words, he coined a phrase that ended up as part of the national popular wisdom: “It is always better to be rich than to be poor.” The sentence competes only with one that Francisco Maturana, former trainer of the Colombian national soccer team, offered after one more defeat: “Losing is winning a little.” Both have been the object of general mockery and scorn, but they are maxims that suggest why the portrait of Kid Pambelé remains as lonely as the boxing ring of San Basilio and the man who inspired the painting. He still wanders in search of his past glory, while his family would give all they have to bring him back, even though he sold all the properties he had in Cartagena and Caracas, including the house he had bought for his mother.
 
The music that flows through San Basilio in the form of bullerengue, son palenquero, chalupa, chalusonga, lumbalú, mapalé and champeta and the extremely erotic, expressive, skillful and challenging dances that palenqueros perform makes us wonder if the palenquero boxer has something like the jogo de cintura of a Ronaldinho who seems to dance samba while he plays soccer. But in San Basilio there is no clear bridge between combat and dance. The punches that led Pambelé to his glory and fall had more force and violence than the power of congregation, bonding, cultural reaffirmation or erotic seduction of dances like mapalé. In his fight against poverty and the meanness of a world in which you “hit or you are hit” (“te chingas o te chingan,” in Mexican terms), the Kid had moved far away from his own people into an environment where the wealthy and privileged class adopted him as a trophy of national success, but abandoned him when he turned into a falling idol lost in a limbo of cocaine. 
Later on Sunday a heavy rain begins to fall. The lonely boxing trainer closes the doors of the gymnasium and says he is this close to throwing the towel. He complains because there are few youngsters ready to dedicate their lives to boxing and embrace the hard discipline required to have a new palenquero world champion. Most of them run away from punches and prefer to go in search of glory as singers. They play champeta, a growing rhythm of Cartagena, similar to reggaeton. During October’s drums annual festivity, this Cimarron enclave turns into a cosmopolitan center. Tourists from all around the world come and gather with the palenqueros, this time not to see a black man knocking down another man in exchange for a golden belt in the Madison Square Garden, but to celebrate a rebirth of the same power that led the fists of Biohó towards freedom. Imagine the people, all dressed in white, gathered to chant a lumbalú to honor the life of their dear Antonio Cervantes, Kid Pambelé, son of Benkos Biohó and San Basilio de Palenque in 
the language of the village: 
“Chi ma nkongo, 
chi ma luango, 
chi ma ri Luango di Angola e;
Huan Gungú me ñamo yo;
Huan Gungú me a de nyamá, ee.” 
 
“De los congos (soy),
De los loangos (soy),
De los de Loango de Angola (soy), eh;
Juan Gungú me llamo yo;
Juan Gungú me han de llamar, eeh.” 
(Translation by Armin Schwegler in “Chi ma “kongo”: Lengua y ritos ancestrales en El Palenque de San Basilio (Colombia)

Bailar o Boxear

La lucha de San Basilio de Palenque

By Andrés Sanín 

Es domingo, las calles son de tierra y lo único que llega a San Basilio de Palenque son un puñado de moto-taxis y un bus viejo de La Rinascente. De las motos bajan los vendedores ambulantes que día a día viajan más de una hora hasta las playas de Cartagena de Indias para venderles dulces artesanales a los turistas. El bus es de un tour de turistas de los pueblos vecinos que vienen a ver un show de mapalé, pues los buses públicos pasan derecho por la carretera principal, sin tomar la estrecha carretera destapada que va a dar al corazón de San Basilio. En el centro de la plaza sobresalen una capilla de colores pastel, una cancha de micro-fútbol y una escultura que toca el cielo con sus manos, pese a colgar de su mano una cadena de hierro. Se trata de Benkos Biohó, famoso entre los palenqueros, anónimo para la mayoría de colombianos. Príncipe de Guinea Bissau, Biohó fue secuestrado por portugueses, traficado y vendido como esclavo al español Alonso del Campo en 1596. Tras hundirse la barca en la que lo llevaban por el río Magdalena, huyó y lideró desde los Montes de María la resistencia de un grupo de cimarrones con los que fundaría San Basilio de Palenque, considerado por muchos como el “primer territorio liberado de América” y, desde 2005, “Obra Maestra del Patrimonio Oral e Inmaterial de la Humanidad” según la UNESCO. Pese al flamante nombramiento, Biohó no recibió mayor atención en la conmemoración del bicentenario de la independencia de los pueblos americanos y poco se recordó la forma heroica en que murió tras la traición del entonces gobernador de Cartagena del tratado de paz entre españoles y palenqueros.

Es domingo, hace calor, no hay alcantarillado y en cambio la población crece a medida que llegan campesinos desplazados por un conflicto entre guerrilleros, paramilitares y el Estado en los Montes de María, en el que los palenqueros dicen no querer tener ningún interés. El único sonido es el de la champeta que sigue animando las calles, sin que pueda decirse que el viejo Palenque es un lugar donde la violencia resuena. El palenque carga una historia de opresión, miseria y violencia colonial, pero San Basilio recibe este domingo a los turistas con el ritmo alegre de los picos (parlantes ambulantes) y el baile alegre con el que una madre arrulla a sus gemelos.

Tras una reja, en el patio de la escuela pública, los niños juegan al fútbol y aquellos que posan para la cámara, muestran sus puños en posición de combate. No es solo el eco de Benkos Biohó, sino el de otro “santo” de San Basilio, caído en desgracia por las traiciones del éxito, la fama, el dinero y la falta de educación para lidiar con ellas. Del otro lado de la cancha de fútbol, en el centro de boxeo que inauguró Coldeportes en el 2007 (un palacio en comparación con el estado del resto de construcciones, solo comparable al recién inaugurado centro cultural), un retrato del Kid Pambelé se asoma entre luces y sombras. Es el recuerdo borroso del palenquero que de lustra botas pasó al centro de la gloria, cuando el 28 de octubre de 1972 noqueó a ganó el título walter junior (140 libras) y se coronó como campeón mundial de boxeo. A su éxito en hacer de San Basilio el foco de atención y orgullo nacional se sumarían luego los hermanos Ricardo y Prudencio Cardona, campeones del mundo en las divisiones de supergallo y mosca, respectivamente. Pero fue Antonio Cervantes, kid Pambelé, el que hizo el milagro no solo de ser campeón por casi ocho años y defender su título mundial en 21 combates, sino también de entrar en el Palacio de Nariño, traer de la mano al presidente de la República, Misael Pastrana Borrero y con este el tan esperado y nunca visto servicio de electricidad y acueducto, en un evento donde el santo del pueblo ya no fue San Basilio, sino San Pambelé. El Kid sorprendió a un país acostumbrado a las derrotas y, según dice el periodista Juan Gossaín, le enseñó a ganar y dejar de tener alma de perdedor.

¿Dónde estaba ese mismo enclenque y temeroso boxeador al que su entrenador había rebautizado como La Amenaza Negra? ¿Dónde estaba ese pícaro digno de las Novelas Ejemplares de Cervantes que había apostado en contra de sí mismo en una pelea, con tan mala suerte que su propio contrincante había hecho lo mismo y se había lanzado primero a la lona sin recibir golpe alguno? Al parecer, el exilio a Caracas tras el desprestigio del artilugio, la férrea disciplina y hasta las duras palabras de “motivación” de su nuevo entrenador dieron resultado. Según dice el periodista Eugenio Baena en el documental Pambelé Genio y Figura, Ramiro Machado, al ver en las peleas que el Kid no reaccionaba, le gritaba cosas como: “Negro H.P. Tú serás un esclavo si no ganas esta pelea. Malparido. Tira el jab. Qué te pasa, negro, qué te pasa? Siempre serás de una raza inferior si no ganas esta pelea”. Pambelé dice que palabras como esas no lo ponían bravo, sino que lo estimularon, pero habría que pensar si no fueron palabras como esas, pronunciadas desde siglos atrás a generaciones y generaciones, desde la Colonia, las que lo arrojaron del oro de la gloria a la oscuridad blanca de la droga. Como un quijote envilecido por el recuerdo de la gloria pasada, hoy el Kid se debate entre ser Antonio Cervantes, ex campeón mundial de boxeo, o la “Amenaza negra”. En el imaginario nacional y en archivos como Youtube, conviven las imágenes de algunos de sus 44 knock outs en plazas como el Madison Square Garden … con aquellas en las que se le ve alzando esos puños alucinados con los que ha atacado a peatones, periodistas y todo aquel que niegue ver en él al actual Campeón del Mundo. Hombre de pocas palabras, nuestro Cervantes negro, tras su última caída, acuñó una frase que se convertiría en parte de la sabiduría popular nacional: “Siempre es mejor ser rico que pobre”. La frase compite solo con aquella otra que pronunció Francisco Maturana, entrenador de la Selección Colombia tras una derrota más, “Perder es ganar un poco”. Ambas máximas del deporte colombiano han sido objeto de las burlas generalizadas, pero de las dos se puede intentar explicar por qué el retrato del Kid Pambelé permanece tan solo como el ring de boxeo de San Basilio y el hombre aquel que la inspiró y que ha deambulado por las calles repartiendo puños al viento, luego de haber vendido las propiedades que tenía en Cartagena y Caracas, incluida la casa que le había comprado a su madre.

Al preguntarle a Kelvin de las Nieves, un boxeador de 17 años campeón España, qué es el boxeo, este responde: “El arte de pegar y que no te peguen”. Como el Pambe, Nieves es también afro-americano y ha sacrificado una incierta educación por la disciplina de un deporte de origen occidental, en el que prima la ley del más fuerte, el más ágil, el más vivo…El más. La música que fluye por San Basilio en forma de bullerengue, son palenquero, chalupa, chalusonga, lumbalú, mapalé y champetá, y los bailes de extrema dificultad, expresividad y elasticidad como el mapalé harían pensar que el boxeador palenquero tiene gracias a esos ritmos con los que ha crecido algo así como el jogo de cintura de un Ronaldinho en las canchas de fútbol. Evocaríamos entonces bailes rituales de resistencia de esclavos que dieron origen a artes marciales como el Capoeira, pero veríamos que en San Basilio no hay un puente muy claro y predominante entre el combate y el baile. Los puños que llevaron al Kid a la gloria y la caída tenían más fuerza y violencia que un poder congregador, de reafirmación cultural o seducción erótica como el de los bailes rituales africanos o el mapalé. En su lucha contra la pobreza y la mezquindad de un mundo en el que “o pegas o te pegan” (te chingas o te chingan), el Kid se vio en una lucha solitaria que lo llevaría a una cima lejana de los suyos, donde las clases privilegiadas lo acogieron y erigieron como monumento nacional, pero abandonaron tan pronto comenzó su ocaso como ídolo perdido en un limbo de cocaína y orgullo propio.

Es domingo, empieza a diluviar y el retrato del Pambe se pierde en la oscuridad. El solitario entrenador de turno cierra las puertas del gimnasio y dice que está a punto de tirar la toalla. Se queja porque son muy pocos los jóvenes que le apuestan al boxeo y a la férrea disciplina que este deporte demanda. La mayoría le huye a los golpes y prefiere alcanzar la gloria como cantante de champeta, un ritmo de moda en Cartagena que si bien no es el de sus abuelos, algo conserva del poder convocador, integrador y resistente de esos tambores que aún utilizan los palenqueros en sus funerales y que cada octubre durante su festival anual de tambores convierten a este enclave cimarrón, perdido en los márgenes de la carretera del Sol, en un centro cosmopolita al que llegan ya no solo turistas de los pueblos aledaños en un bus de la Rinascente como el que ahora se va, sino del mundo entero. Ya no para ver a un hombre pelear contra otro en torno a un cinturón de campeón, sino para celebrar un nuevo renacer del poder palenquero que movió los puños de Biohó y Pambelé y que hace de este pequeño y pobre lugar, uno de los más grandes y ricos de la cultura afro-colombiana y mundial. Aquel que tras la última caída de su dos veces campeón mundial, en el abismo oscuro de la muerte habrá de entonar, en su lengua palenquera y vestidos todos de blanco, un renacente lumbalú: 

“Chi ma nkongo, 
chi ma luango, 
chi ma ri Luango di Angola e;
Huan Gungú me ñamo yo;
Huan Gungú me a de nyamá, ee.”

“De los congos (soy),
De los loangos (soy),
De los de Loango de Angola (soy), eh;
Juan Gungú me llamo yo;
Juan Gungú me han de llamar, eeh.” 
(traducción de Armin Schwegler en “Chi ma “kongo”: Lengua y ritos ancestrales en El Palenque de San Basilio (Colombia)

Spring 2012Volume XI, Number 3

Andrés Sanín is a lawyer and journalist from the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia. He is currently a doctoral candidate in Harvard’s Romance Languages and Literatures Department.

Andrés Sanín is a lawyer and journalist from the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia. He is currently a doctoral candidate in Harvard’s Romance Languages and Literatures Department.

Related Articles

Sports and Political Imagination in Colombia

Sports and Political Imagination in Colombia

English + Español
A special exhibit entitled “A Country Made of Soccer” at Colombia’s National Museum features press photos, radio narratives, uniforms and other objects associated with the sport. Inaugurated…

Speaking of Baseball

Speaking of Baseball

English + Español
Dice un viejo refrán que no hay nada mejor que el béisbol, que no sea hablar de béisbol. Y con ese propósito nos fuimos el joven periodista deportivo Yasel Porto, el veterano investigador…

Soccer Clubs

Soccer Clubs

English + Español
On June 25, 1978, Argentina and Holland were playing the World Cup final. General Jorge Rafael Videla’s dictatorship had spent millions to organize the Cup; the Montanera guerrilla had…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email