We must demystify Amazonia

by | Feb 4, 2020

Conocer es resolver.

—José Martí, Nuestra América

The image of the wild Amazon jungle full of snakes, monkeys and alligators, is more a Hollywood creation than anything to do with reality. Truth is, it is rare to see wildlife in the Amazon; and it’s not because animals are scarce in one of the most biodiverse places in the world. No. The reality is different. In general, animals hide from people and in Amazonia, so extensive and full of life, wherever you search in its immensity, you can find humans. For hundreds of years (or perhaps even thousands of years earlier than expected), indigenous communities, quilombos and mestizo settlers have found ways to survive and make the jungle their home.

Estos dos hogares son ejemplos de casas construidas en medio de la selva usando palma, madera y latas de cinc, Belém, PA. // These two homes are examples of houses built in the middle of the jungle using palm, wood and zinc roofs, Belém, PA.

In the past, the Amazon was considered a forbidden paradise, a green hell, an archaeological black hole, a territory too hostile to allow large-scale human settlements. However, in recent decades, archeological findings—such as Terra Preta have questioned established notions about the Amazonian past. Likewise, the rock paintings of the Pedra Pintada and innumerable remains of ceramics that are commonly found in the whole region have called attention to how and when humans populated, modified, and cultivated the rainforest. Scholars have even raised the possibility of numerous indigenous settlements in the Xingu River area that were connected by roads in the middle of the jungle.

Thanks to the Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Fellowship, a scholarship awarded to Harvard College alumni to fund a year of purposeful postgraduate travel, I had the opportunity to explore the Brazilian Amazon as a volunteer in several social projects in the fields of education, public health, and environmental conservation. During my travels, I beheld the magical—almost unreal—beauty of the region, which has borne fruit to countless legends and ideas about the area, as a mystical place (almost utopian), that is steeped in mystery, where life and reality are of a different kind.

Pinturas rupestres de más de 11.200 años en el sitio arqueológico Caverna da Pedra Pintada, Monte Alegre, PA. // Rock paintings of more than 11,200 years old in the archaeological site Caverna da Pedra Pintada, Monte Alegre, PA.

In my wanderings, I encountered social realities and natural environments vastly different from what I was used to. There, sea-like rivers extend to the horizon. Entire communities float on the water or rest on wooden platforms along the embankmentsThe environment is continuously changing as the rain-water from the Andes floods the forests, plains, and entire islands for months, which then resurface during the summer. Flora and fauna are surreal. There are gigantic and prehistoric fishes such as the Pirarucu and the Tambaqui, or almost human mammals such as the Boto and the Peixe-boi, and supernatural trees such as Sumaumas. However, I also confronted a land affected by underdevelopment, overwhelmed by endogenous difficulties such as deforestation and lack of economic opportunities beyond illicit economies.

Upon arriving in Brazil, at the beginning of 2018,  I began to inquire about the region and look for contacts of organizations and professionals who worked in the Amazon. In the midst of the excitement of carnival in Rio de Janeiro, I remember telling a man, well into his sixties and a retired member of the army, about my plans to visit the jungle. He answered, though almost sardonically, “You will see! In Manaus, there are more gringos than Indians.”

Puerto de Manaos durante el verano o la seca. // Manaus’s Port during summer or the dry season.

That term “gringo”—used in many parts of Latin America to refer to foreigners, often from the United States—was part of an assertion (although exaggerated and prejudiced) with a degree of truth, at least in the city of Manaus. Considered as the portal of the Brazilian Amazon, Manaus is a cosmopolitan city overflowed by non-profit organizations, tourism companies, and many foreigners looking to visit, work or volunteer in the Amazon. Not all foreigners, however, are U.S. gringos. Actually, most of them come from Europe, Latin America, and the south of Brazil—the whitest and wealthiest part of the country. Unfortunately, this idea has played into a stereotype of an “invasion” of the Amazon by foreigners and NGOs, has become a prejudice that the powers in Brazil—mainly the reactionary right that has been encouraged by the Bolsonaro government—have begun to use in an alarming manner to declare war on social organizations. And this has had disastrous consequences.

Recently, a Brazilian friend, whom I met as a volunteer in the city of Santarém (known as the “Caribbean of the Amazon”), was arrested along with three other members of the Brigada de Incêndio Florestal de Alter do Chão—a group of volunteer firefighters who have helped to combat forest fires—under hasty assumptions. Within a few days, without any clear explanation, they were released. This event raised numerous criticisms from civil society and the international community about the hostility of the authorities and the current Brazilian government against environmentalists and social organizations that defend the rainforest and its people.

Playa al lado de río Tapajos, Santarém. Región considerada como el «Caribe de la Amazonía». // A river beach next to the Tapajos river, Santarém. A region considered to be “The Caribbean of the Amazon.”

This paranoia is not restricted to the reactionary powers on the right. Sadly, there is some widespread hostility (and one could even say xenophobia) against foreigners in the region. In my days in Brazil, while attending a private event with some politicians, I personally heard an important leader of one of the main leftist parties in the country, without noticing my origins or my work, complain about the presence of “Americans” who sought to seize the Amazon and its wealth. The man’s unrestrained opinion made me understand that possessive and nationalist prejudices are on both sides of the political spectrum. This is disconcerting, considering circumstances such as the arrest of the Alter do Chão Brigade, unsubstantiated opinions can cause harm and are counterproductive to the actions of those who seek the development and well-being of a region that faces harsh setbacks and painfully avoidable inequalities. Given the problems, the urgency of acting must prevail over who acts.

 

After a year of traveling through the Amazon (from Belém do Pará, where the jungle meets the Atlantic coast, to the triple frontier between Brazil, Peru, and Colombia), I was fortunate to volunteer and travel with multiple social organizations that seek to improve the well-being of the region and its people: from an NGO that gifts books and builds libraries for children and youths in riverside communities, to centers that provide environmental research and technical agricultural assistance for farmers, and even a hospital ship that brings medical care and medicine for free to remote villages where electricity or mobile signal still do not reach. Through these organizations, community members, compatriots from all over Brazil, and foreigners come together to make life more bearable and fair in places where the state has no presence or resources to act. However, injustices prevail throughout the region where it is not uncommon to see symptoms of malnutrition, child exploitation, illiteracy, and preventable ailments that today should not condemn anyone to death.

In my interest to observe healthcare in practice, I managed to volunteer on the hospital ship Abaré—a model of healthcare access for riverside communities throughout Brazil. For two weeks, we sail along the Tapajós river from the towns of Boim to Vila Franca. Since the Abaré appeared at the bottom of the river to dock at the shore of the different communities, dozens of people were already lined up to receive medicines or be treated for various reasons from pregnancies follow-ups to toothaches. Other community members waited in barracks, school halls, or huts, signing up to receive social assistance (Bolsa Família) or listening to the talks of the tutelary counselors—a government body responsible for combating child abuse. Occasionally, the heavy and serious air of the meetings was interrupted by the cries of the children and the pets being vaccinated, or by the chatter of adults bragging about their ability to withstand the pain of the injections.

The hospital ship Abaré was undoubtedly the best way to serve, but also to understand the importance of proactivity in public health—to go to the people and look for the problems directly—and the significance that the fundamental rights of citizens (particularly of the most vulnerable) are taken care of without compromising their way of life. Life in the midst of nature should still be compatible with decent well-being, with access to quality education and healthcare.

Navío hospital Abaré anclado al lado de la Villa de Boim, río Tapajos Santarém (PA). // The hospital ship Abaré anchored next to the Vila de Boim, Tapajos river near Santarém (PA).

Months before my trip in the Abaré, I had experienced a tragedy that showed me the difficulties of living in the jungle. While traveling in a catamaran from the small town of Breves to the city of Belém, I witnessed the dying battle of a newborn and his indigenous mother to reach medical care. The baby was born with a deformity in his stomach and needed surgery in the nearest city, days by boat or several hours traveling by speedboat. After some hours of travel, the baby began to suffer complications. Desperate, everyone on the boat watched with frustration and grief as the crew tried to ask for help at several health posts in the region. However, most of the posts were closed without anyone to attend them, after Cuba had withdrawn the thousands of doctors who participated in the program Mais Médicos following a diplomatic dispute with the newly elected government of Jair Bolsonaro. After ten endless hours of anguish, we arrived in Belém. By then, it appeared to be too late. The mother´s grim look foretold a tragic end. This was a painful teaching of how the isolation and the abandonment found in the Amazon can be a deadly trap.

Niño disfruta del nuevo acervo de libros donados por la ONG Vaga Lume a su comunidad, cerca del Estrecho de Breves, una de las regiones más empobrecidas de la Amazonia brasileña. // Niño enjoys the new collection of books donated by the NGO Vaga Lume to his community, near the Strait of Breves, one of the most impoverished regions of the Brazilian Amazon.

In recent days that Amazonia has been in the front pages of world news because of the large number of forest fires, increases in the rates of deforestation and the violence against social leaders and indigenous communities, I think we could use some education about the region to consciously try to demystify it. Although magical and beautiful, the Amazonian territory of more than 7 million km² among nine countries is not a deserted place or a forbidden and intact paradise. Although it is still a remote region, covered by imposing rivers and centuries-old trees, it is a fragile place not at all exempt from the socio-economic evils and injustices that plague the rest of the continent.

If the Amazonia is demystified, we can see it as a territory comparable to the rest of the continent. An extension that needs the same level of attention as cities or agricultural areas. Also, we will see a place of priceless existential value for the entire world, which is often treated as a monolith, but it is not. It is a vast territory, which needs differentiating help according to each area. However, the problems that Amazonia faces are real and colossal, and no country can solve them alone. Multilateral commitments such as the Leticia Pact and, above all, more action are necessary. Not only because the region, as a biome, belongs to multiple nations, but also as an essential natural resource for the existence of humanity, its survival must matter to all of us. At the moment, as individuals, the best we can do for Amazonia is to learn about it; because ignoring its reality and potential not only helps to feed the myths and prejudices that hold back the region but also makes us indirect accomplices of its destruction.

 

Debemos desmitificar la Amazonía

Por Daniel Alejandro Martínez

Conocer es resolver.

—José Martí, Nuestra América

La imagen de la jungla salvaje, llena de serpientes, micos y caimanes se conforma mejor a la descripción de la selva desde Hollywood que a la realidad misma. En verdad, es raro ver fauna en el Amazonas. Y no porque escaseen los animales en uno de los lugares más biodiversos del mundo. No. La realidad es otra. Por lo general los animales se esconden de la gente, y en la Amazonía, tan extensa y llena de vida, donde se busque entre toda su inmensidad se pueden encontrar personas. Por cientos de años (o quizás miles de años antes de lo pensando), comunidades indígenas, quilombos y colonos mestizos, de una manera u otra han encontrado como sobrevivir, y han hecho de la selva su hogar.

Estos dos hogares son ejemplos de casas construidas en medio de la selva usando palma, madera y latas de cinc, Belém, PA. // These two homes are examples of houses built in the middle of the jungle using palm, wood and zinc roofs, Belém, PA.

En el pasado, la Amazonía fue considera un paraíso prohibido, un infierno verde, un agujero negro arqueológico, un territorio demasiado hostil para permitir asentamientos humanos a gran escala. Sin embargo, en las últimas décadas, hallazgos arqueológicos—como la Terra Preta han puesto en duda nociones sobre el pasado amazónico. Asimismo, las pinturas rupestres de la Pedra Pintada e innumerables restos de cerámicas que se encuentran sin mucho mirar en toda la región, llaman la atención sobre cómo y cuándo los humanos poblaron, modificaron y cultivaron la selva. Incluso, se ha considerado la posibilidad de numerosos asentamientos indígenas en el área del río Xingu conectados por carreteras en medio de la floresta.

Gracias a la beca Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Fellowship (un fondo que patrocina a exalumnos de Harvard College para realizar un año de viaje de posgrado con propósito), tuve la oportunidad de conocer la Amazonía brasileña como voluntario en varios proyectos sociales en las áreas de educación, salud pública, y conservación ambiental. Durante este recorrido, fui testigo de la belleza mágica—casi irreal—de la región, que ha dado fruto a innumerables leyendas e ideas sobre esta como un lugar místico (tal vez utópico), empapado de misterio, donde la vida y la realidad es otra.

Pinturas rupestres de más de 11.200 años en el sitio arqueológico Caverna da Pedra Pintada, Monte Alegre, PA. // Rock paintings of more than 11,200 years old in the archaeological site Caverna da Pedra Pintada, Monte Alegre, PA.

En mis andanzas, fui testigo de realidades sociales y entornos naturales completamente diferentes a lo que estaba acostumbrado. Allí los ríos-mares se extienden hasta el horizonte. Comunidades enteras flotan sobre los ríos o reposan en caseríos en plataformas de madera sobre el litoral. El entorno cambia constantemente mientras el agua-lluvia proveniente de los Andes inunda bosques, planicies e islas enteras por meses bajo el agua y que luego resurgen como de la nada durante el verano. La flora y la fauna son surreales. Existen peces gigantescos y prehistóricos como el Pirarucu y el Tambaqui, o mamíferos casi humanos como el Boto y el Peixe-boi, y árboles sobrenaturales como los Sumaumas. No obstante, también presencié una tierra inmersa en la realidad muy real del subdesarrollo, agobiada por dificultades endógenas como la deforestación y la falta de sustento económico más allá de las economías ilícitas.

 

Al llegar a Brasil, a comienzos del 2018, en medio de la recocha hilarante del carnaval de Río de Janeiro, mientras indagaba sobre la región y buscaba contactos de organizaciones y profesionales que trabajaran allí, recuerdo que le comenté sobre mis planes de visitar la Amazonía a un señor trigueño de sensata y punta de años y militar retirado del ejército, el cual me respondió con un reproche disfrazado en risas: “Verá que en Manaos hay más gringos que indios.”

Puerto de Manaos durante el verano o la seca. // Manaus’s Port during summer or the dry season.

Aquel termino de «gringo»—usado en muchas partes de América Latina para referirse a extranjeros, usualmente estadounidenses—era parte de una aseveración, aunque exagerada y prejuiciosa, con un grado de verdad, por lo menos en la ciudad de Manaos. Considerada como el portal de la Amazonía brasileña, Manaos es una ciudad cosmopolita donde abundan organizaciones sin ánimo de lucro, compañías de turismo y muchos extranjeros que visitan, trabajan o llevan a cabo voluntariados e intercambios culturales. Cabe aclarar que no todos son gringos norteamericanos. En realidad, hay muchos extranjeros europeos, latinoamericanos y del sur de Brasil —la parte más blanca y próspera de todo el país. Infelizmente, este estereotipo de una Amazonía ‘invadida’ por extranjeros y por las ONG es un prejuicio que los poderes en Brasil, principalmente la derecha reaccionaria que se ha visto alentada por el gobierno Bolsonaro, han comenzado a usar de forma alarmantemente para declararle la guerra a las organizaciones sociales. Y esto ha tenido consecuencias desastrosas.

Recientemente, un amigo brasileño, a quien conocí como voluntario en el «caribe de la Amazonía,» la ciudad de Santarém, fue arrestado junto a otros tres miembros de la Brigada de Incêndio Florestal de Alter do Chão —un grupo de bomberos voluntarios que han ayudado a combatir los incendios forestales— bajo presunciones apresuradas y poco legales. A los pocos días, sin ninguna explicación clara, fueron liberados. El hecho levantó numerosas críticas de parte de la sociedad civil y la comunidad internacional sobre la hostilidad de las autoridades y el actual gobierno brasileño contra ambientalistas y las organizaciones sociales que defienden la selva y su gente.

 

Playa al lado de río Tapajos, Santarém. Región considerada como el «Caribe de la Amazonía». // A river beach next to the Tapajos river, Santarém. A region considered to be “The Caribbean of the Amazon.”

Esta paranoia no está restringida a los poderes reaccionarios de la derecha. Tristemente, existe cierta hostilidad (y se podría decir xenofobia) generalizada contra los extranjeros que actúan en la región. En mis días en Brasil, mientras atendía a un evento privado con algunos políticos escuché personalmente a un dirigente importante de uno de los principales partidos de izquierda del país reclamar, sin percatarse de mis orígenes ni mi trabajo, sobre la presencia de «americanos» que buscaban apoderarse de la Amazonía y sus riquezas. La opinión desmesurada de aquel hombre me dio a entender que los prejuicios celosos y nacionalistas se encuentra de lado y lado del espectro político. Esto resulta desconcertante, pues como ocurrió con los Brigadistas de Alter do Chão, opiniones sin fundamento causan daño y son contraproducentes al accionar de quienes buscan el desarrollo y bienestar de una región que enfrenta atrasos y desigualdades penosamente evitables. Dado a los problemas, la urgencia de actuar debe primar por encima del quién actúa.

Tras un año de viaje por la Amazonía—desde Belém do Pará, donde la selva se encuentra con la costa Atlántica, hasta la trifrontera de Brasil, Perú y Colombia—tuve la suerte de compartir con múltiples organizaciones sociales que buscan mejorar el bienestar de la región y su gente: desde una ONG que regala libros y crea bibliotecas para niños y jóvenes en comunidades ribereñas, hasta centros de investigación ambiental y de asistencia técnica para campesinos, e incluso un navío-hospital que lleva atención médica y medicina gratuita a comunidades remotas donde todavía no llega la electricidad o la señal móvil. Por medio de estas organizaciones se unen comunitarios, compatriotas de todo Brasil, y extranjeros coterráneos, para hacer de la vida más llevadera y justa en lugares donde el estado no tiene presencia ni recursos para actuar. Sin embargo, injusticias todavía perduran en toda la Amazonía, en donde no es extraño ver síntomas de desnutrición, explotación infantil, analfabetismo, y dolencias prevenibles que hoy en día no deberían condenar a nadie a la muerte.

En mi inquietud de presenciar la salud en práctica, me las arreglé para ser voluntario en el navío-hospital Abaré—un modelo referente de la salud fluvial en todo Brasil. A lo largo de dos semanas navegamos a la margen del río Tapajós desde la villa de Boim hasta Vila Franca. Desde que el Abaré asomaba al fondo del río para orillarse en las comunidades, ya decenas de comunitarios hacían fila para recibir medicinas o ser atendidos por causas varias desde seguimientos de embarazos hasta dolores de muela. A lo largo de la visita, los demás comunitarios esperaban en barracones, salas de escuelas o chozas de capim de palma, realizando sus registros para recibir asistencia social (Bolsa Família) o escuchando la charla de los consejeros tutelares—un órgano del gobierno diseñado para combatir el abuso a menores. En ocasiones, el aire pesado y serio de las pláticas era interrumpido por los alaridos de los niños y las mascotas siendo vacunados, o por la cháchara de los adultos vanagloriándose de su capacidad de soportar el pinchazo de las inyecciones.

Navío hospital Abaré anclado al lado de la Villa de Boim, río Tapajos Santarém (PA). // The hospital ship Abaré anchored next to the Vila de Boim, Tapajos river near Santarém (PA).

El navío-hospital Abaré fue, sin duda, la mejor forma para servir de manera práctica, pero también para entender la importancia de que la salud pública sea proactiva—que vaya hasta las personas—y, de que los derechos básicos de los ciudadanos (en particular los más vulnerables) sean atendidos sin comprometer su forma de vida. La vida en medio de la naturaleza debería ser compatible con un bienestar digno, con educación y salud de calidad.

Meses antes de mi viaje en el Abaré, fui testigo de una tragedia que me mostró las dificultades de vivir en medio de la selva. Mientras viajaba en un catamarán desde el pequeño pueblo de Breves hasta la ciudad de Belém, presencié la batalla agonizante de un recién nacido y su madre indígena por recibir atención medica. El bebé había nacido con una deformidad en el estómago y tenía que ser operado en la ciudad, a días en barco u horas navegando en lancha rápida. Después de varias horas de viaje, el bebé comenzó a sufrir complicaciones. Desesperados, todos observamos con frustración y desconsuelo mientras la tripulación de la lancha intentaba pedir ayuda en algún puesto de salud de la región. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los puestos estaban cerrados sin nadie que atendiera, luego de que Cuba retirará los miles de médicos que participaban del programa Mais Médicos tras choques diplomáticos con el recién electo gobierno Bolsonaro. Luego de diez horas interminables llenas de angustia, llegamos a Belém. Sin embargo para entonces parecía ser demasiado tarde. La mirada sombría de la madre ya anunciaba un final trágico. Esta fue una dolorosa enseñanza de la trampa mortal que puede ser el aislamiento y abandono en la Amazonía.

Niño disfruta del nuevo acervo de libros donados por la ONG Vaga Lume a su comunidad, cerca del Estrecho de Breves, una de las regiones más empobrecidas de la Amazonia brasileña. // Niño enjoys the new collection of books donated by the NGO Vaga Lume to his community, near the Strait of Breves, one of the most impoverished regions of the Brazilian Amazon.

En estos días que la Amazonía ha estado en las primeras páginas de las noticias mundiales por el gran número de incendios forestales, alzas en las tasas de deforestación y violencia contra líderes sociales y comunidades indígenas, creo que nos vendría bien educarnos sobre la región, haciendo una tarea consciente para desmitificarla. Aunque mágico y bello, el territorio amazónico de más de 7 millones de km² entre nueve países, no es un lugar desierto de gente o un paraíso prohibido e intacto. Aunque todavía es una región remota, cubierta por ríos imponentes y árboles centenarios, es un lugar frágil y para nada exento de los males socioeconómicos e injusticias que plagan al resto del continente.

Desmitificada, podremos ver en la Amazonía un territorio comparable con el resto del continente. Una extensión que necesita igual atención que las urbes o las zonas agrícolas. También, veremos un lugar con valor existencial innumerable para el mundo entero, el cual con frecuencia se trata como un monolito pero no lo es. Es un área extensa, que necesita de ayuda diferenciada de acuerdo a cada parte del territorio. Sin embargo, los problemas que la Amazonía afrenta son reales y colosales, y ningún país puede solucionarlos solo. Compromisos multilaterales como El Pacto de Leticia y sobretodo más acción son necesarios. No solo porque la región, como bioma, le pertenece a múltiples naciones, pero también como recurso natural esencial para la existencia de la humanidad su supervivencia nos debe importar a todos. Por el momento, como individuos, lo mejor que podemos hacer por ella es conocerla, pues ignorar su realidad y potencial no solo ayuda a alimentar los mitos y prejuicios que atrasan a la región, sino también nos hace cómplices indirectos de su destrucción.

 

Spring/Summer 2020, Volume XIX, Number 3

Daniel Martínez is a Colombian (sonsoneño) trained at Harvard in Social Sciences and Philosophy. Fellow of the Gates Millennium Scholarship and Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Fellowship. He traveled the Brazilian Amazon working with social projects on education, health, and environmental conservation. You can follow his trip on the blog: danielmgsa.com.

Daniel Martínez, es un colombiano sonsoneño formado en Harvard en Ciencias Sociales y Filosofía. Becario del Gates Millennium Scholarship y Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Fellowship. Recorrió la Amazonia brasileña trabajando con proyectos sociales en las áreas de educación, salud y medioambiente. Pueden acompañar su viaje en el blog: danielmgsa.com.

Related Articles

Amazon: Editor’s Letter

Amazon: Editor’s Letter

The Amazon is burning. The trees that have not been cut down are on fire. The crisis is now. When I began to work on this issue on the Amazon, that was pretty much my vision, and it was a real one. I was determined to make the magazine on the Amazon about…

How Democracies Die

How Democracies Die

How Democracies Die analyzes the main dangers that modern democracies face. As the authors warn, 21st-century democracies do not die in one fell swoop, in a violent way, by hands that do not always belong to the political system. On the contrary, modern democracies…

The Return of Collective Intelligence

The Return of Collective Intelligence

My college Native American Culture professor,  the Mescalero Apache scholar Inez Sánchez, told our class that we should regard the word “primitive” as synonymous with “complex.” I gained a better understanding of what Sánchez meant reading The Return of Collective…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email