Xocoatl

The History of Mexican Chocolate Intermingling

by | May 24, 2020

Legend has it that the god Quetzalcóatl gave the Aztecs the cacao tree. Ambrosia or nourishment of the gods as its scientific name Theobroma Cacao indicates. Furthermore, cacao is where chocolate comes from. Both words, chocolate and cacao, come originally from the Nahuatl language, Xocoatl, and Cacahoatlrespectively, and refer to the bitter and spicy mix that the Aztecs made with cacao beans and water. Moreover, cacao was not only delighted in by the Aztecs, but it was also a daily drink for other Mesoamerican societies such as the Olmecs and the Mayans.  Christopher Columbus was said to be the first Spaniard to enjoy it, and it was the Spaniards who later took cacao to Europe where it started to metamorphose into what we know it now, mixed with milk and sugar, and almost always leaving aside the zesty spices with which it was accompanied in the New World. Now it is more common to recognize this delicacy as a solid, shaped like a bar, with different degrees of sweetness, but only the most conversant venture to taste it in its most bitter notes. Nevertheless, it did take a long time for the chocolate to take that shape.

pdf

“Cacao criollo” by Cheque is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Chocolate in Mexico and in many Latin American countries is still a hot drink and considered a stimulant, sometimes even passing coffee in popularity in the region. And that was one of the reasons that it arrived in Spain. Hernan Cortes is said to have taken cacao to King Carlos V, professing that a cup of this mash would give energy to a soldier the entire day. Then new imaginings began about the medicinal properties of chocolate, not in vain, but instead gained by virtue. At this point, chocolate conquered Europe, still in artisan preparation, perhaps in revenge for the conquest from where it had been taken, but without a doubt taking root in the palates of the Old World.

The first industrial chocolate factory is believed to have been founded in Switzerland in the second decade of the 19th century. Nevertheless, it was the Dutch who soon perfected the industrialized process of preparation. At this point, chocolate was not yet developed in solid form as it is popular today but was instead consumed as chocolate powder and cacao butter. A couple of decades later, the first chocolate bars were minted. It is not entirely clear if this advance comes from the English or the Italians, since both dispute authorship. What is clear is that for the second part of the century in question, there were already tablets and chocolate candy, which were gradually becoming popular. A couple of years later, chocolate arrived in the United States, and in 1894 Hershey democratized its consumption by starting to sell it in reasonably priced bars, and by the beginning of the 20th century, filled chocolates were also marketed. These latest achievements, unfortunately, led the chocolate industry to prioritize quantity over quality. And it is not until the end of the 20th century that new pioneering companies in the industry begin to retake the sybaritic culture of fine chocolate around the world.

Today, the two largest chocolate companies in the world are North American. Mars Inc., a private company founded in 1911 and owner of popular brands such as M&Ms and Snickers, and the multinational Mondelez International founded in 2012 that produces brands such as Oreo, Milka, Toblerone and Cadbury. Making it clear that chocolate has had a long passage to cross bitter water, even candied chocolate that “melts in your mouth, not in your hand.” In contrast, many companies produce chocolate, but most of them only small-scale, artisanal processes privileging quality to quantity and looking for a worldly market usually willing to experience the new, or paradoxically seeking the melancholic trail of the classic.

Back in Mexico, there is a company that makes powdered and table chocolate in Guadalajara that seeks to preserve tradition. Founded in 1925, Chocolate Ibarra proudly stands as a 100% Mexican company competing for head-on with multinational brands such as Nestle, which acquired in 1990 its main competitor, Chocolate Abuelita. Ibarra has consolidated its commercial activity by offering a high-quality product, made with natural ingredients, and maintaining its brand recognition in the Mexican market and offering its product in gourmet stores around the world.

However, Mexico is no longer the core of cacao production, as it was in pre-Hispanic times, although cacao is still cultivated in indigenous communities in various states of the country, such as Chiapas, Guerrero and mainly Tabasco. Mexico only represents about three percent of world production. Cacao production currently comes primarily from Africa, mainly Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, and Cameroon, which together account for nearly seventy percent of world production. This has created new challenges, such as the exploitation of peasants and child labor. This has led to the creation of new measures necessary to balance the balance of power between small producers and industrialists, such as fair trade initiatives, to the creation of responsible companies such as Tony Chocolonely´s, founded in the Netherlands in 2005 that promotes the 100% slavery-free chocolate. Companies like Tony Chocolonely raise the bar of fair trade, promoting an industry free of exploitation, free of slavery and free of child labor, perhaps in the more obvious way possible, leading by example and eliminating intermediaries to buy cacao beans directly from small producers, providing them with a much better price for their production and empowering them to combat exploitation.

Chef José Ramón Castillo is undoubtedly one of the greatest promoters and exponents of contemporary Mexican chocolate, or as he defines it, “the evolutionary Mexican chocolate shop.” Since 2012, Josera, as his friends know him, has been recognized as one of the best chocolatiers in the world and has received numerous international awards, including medals from the International Chocolate Awards and recognitions from the Mexican government and UNESCO. In 2004 he founded the chocolate shop Que Bo! located in four of the most representative neighborhoods of Mexico City. This chocolatier offers visitors a multisensory  tasting experience  that captivates from appearance, with bright colors and unexpected tones, through scent s unmistakable s and seductive is of truffles and chocolates to reach intense flavors suggestive. Josera’s palette of flavors is extensive and unconventional, offering from everyday flavors for the most traditional, going through tastes of orange with worm salt, tamarind, or even flavors of gansito and mango boing (flavors challenging to describe for foreigners, but that are deeply rooted in many Mexicans’ taste). After that, some other Mexican chocolate shops have followed suit in different Mexican cities. Some of them sell their products under organic labels and are distributed in commercial chains around the world. Ki’Xocolatl in Yucatan claims to be one of the few chocolate factories in the world that works directly from the cacao bean. Founded in 2002 by Stephanie Verbrugge and Mathieu Bre, two Belgians based in the city of Merida, they sell fine artisan chocolate bars, as a tribute to Mayan culture and Mexican cacao. The company´s name is a combination of Mayan and Nahuatl that states “delicious chocolate.”

pdf

José Ramón Castillo” by APEGA Sociedad Peruana de Gastronomía is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

In a globalized world, the crossbreeding of chocolate is, without a doubt, a simile of the intermixing of Mexican people. Chocolate in Mexico is no longer taken as bitter as it was in the past, but it is still taken a bit spiced, now with a slight touch of cinnamon and cloves and in the world, it begins to interpret with unexplored flavors, such as chili, sea salt or countless flavors. It stopped being an aristocratic drink to become a pleasure for everyone. It is consumed in Mexican houses accompanied by churros, sweet bread, and other delicacies, but it is also consumed in many other places in incomparable ways. In Mexico, it is most popular when it is cold, and that is perhaps why it is to be taken as a complement to seasonal winter delights, especially around Christmas time, like the rosca of Three Kings Day or Day of the Dead bread. But it also tastes good outside in the summer in a gelato when the temperature rises. Also, in Mexico, it is usually thickened with corn meal and drunk with tamales and called champurrado. Nevertheless, in other places, it can be mixed with hazelnuts and other ingredients and spread on bread. Whether in Mexico or the world, it is genuinely traditional to drink or eat it accompanied by friends and family, in all its forms and with all its troupes. Chocolate comes from Mexico, but it also comes from the world.

Xocoatl

La historia del mestizaje del chocolate mexicano

Por Carlos Vargas 

Cuenta la leyenda que el dios Quetzalcóatl regaló a los Aztecas el árbol del cacao. Ambrosía o pan de dioses como indica su nombre científico Theobroma Cacao. Y es de ahí de donde proviene el chocolate, del cacao. Las palabras chocolate y cacao provienen del náhuatl Xocoatl y Cacahoatl respectivamente, y refieren al agua amarga y picante que los aztecas elaboraban con los granos de cacao. Y no solamente era degustado por este pueblo, sino que también era cotidiano para otros pueblos mesoamericanos como los Olmecas y los Mayas. También se dice que Colón fue el primer peninsular en deleitarlo, y fueron los españoles quienes más tarde llevaron el cacao a Europa donde fuera reinterpretado como lo conocemos ahora, mezclado con leche y azúcar, y casi siempre dejando de lado las especias picantes con que se acompañaba en el nuevo mundo. Ahora es más común reconocer este manjar como una delicia maciza, en barra, con distintos grados de dulzor, y solamente los más entendidos se aventuran a degustarlo en sus notas más amargas. Pero vaya que tomó bastante tiempo para que el chocolate tomara esa forma.

pdf

“Cacao criollo” by Cheque is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

El chocolate en México y en muchos países de Latinoamérica todavía se toma líquido y caliente. Se entiende como estimulante. Aventajando al café en arraigo como bebida vivificante en la región. Y en realidad esa fue una de las razones de que llegara a España, ya que se dice que Hernán Cortés lo llevo al rey Carlos V indicándole que una taza de este potingue llegaba a dar energía a un soldado para todo el día. Y entonces comenzó una nueva entelequia donde se atribuyen propiedades medicinales al chocolate, no en vano, sino más bien ganadas a virtud. Para este punto el chocolate conquistaba Europa, en preparación artesanal, quizá a revancha de la conquista de donde se había tomado, pero sin duda arraigándose en los paladares del viejo mundo.

Se cree que la primera fábrica de chocolate industrial fue fundada en Suiza para la segunda década del siglo 19. Pero fueron los holandeses quienes poco después perfeccionaron el proceso industrializado de su preparación. Pero a este punto el chocolate no había tomado la forma en que se ha popularizado en la actualidad, sino que a este punto hablamos de chocolate en polvo y manteca de cacao. Un par de décadas después se cree que se acuñaron las primeras tabletas de chocolate, pero no es del todo claro si este avance proviene de los ingleses o de los italianos, dado que ambos se disputan el crédito de su autoria.  Lo que sí queda claro es que para la segunda parte del siglo en cuestión ya se contaba con tabletas y golosinas de chocolate, que se comenzaban a popularizar gradualmente. Un par de años más tarde el chocolate llega a los Estados Unidos y en 1894 Hershey democratiza su consumo vendiéndolo en barras de precio asequible y para principios del siglo 20 se comenzaban a comercializar también chocolates rellenos. Estos últimos logros desafortunadamente llevaron a la industria del chocolate a privilegiar la cantidad sobre la calidad. Y no es sino hasta finales del siglo pasado que nuevas empresas pioneras en la industria comienzan retomar la cultura sibarita del chocolate fino alrededor del mundo.

Hoy en día, las dos empresas chocolateras más grandes del mundo son norteamericanas. Mars Inc, empresa privada fundada en 1911 y propietaria de populares marcas como M&Ms y Snickers, y la multinacional Mondelez International fundada en 2012 quien produce marcas como Oreo, Milka, Toblerone y Cadbury. Dejando patente que el chocolate ha tenido un pasaje largo al franquear de agua amarga, hasta el chocolate confitado que “se derrite en tu boca no en tu mano”. En contraste, numerosas empresas, producen chocolate, pero la mayor parte de ellas solo a pequeña escala, en procesos artesanales privilegiando a calidad a la cantidad y buscando a un mercado mundano que suele estar dispuesto a experimentar lo nuevo o que paradójicamente busca el rastro melancólico de lo clásico. De vuelta a México, queda una empresa fabricante de chocolate de mesa y en polvo en Guadalajara que buscan conservar esta tradición. Fundada en 1925, Chocolate Ibarra se ostenta orgullosamente como empresa 100% mexicana que compite frontalmente con marcas multinacionales como Nestlé quien adquiriera en 1990 a su principal competencia, Chocolate Abuelita. Ibarra se ha consolidado en su actividad comercial ofreciendo un producto de alta calidad, hecho con ingredientes naturales y manteniendo su reconocimiento de marca en el mercado mexicano y ofreciendo su producto en tiendas gourmet alrededor del mundo.

Pero México ya no es la médula de la producción del cacao, como lo fue en la época prehispánica, aunque todavía se cultiva en comunidades indígenas de diversos estados del país, como Chiapas, Guerrero y principalmente Tabasco. Mexico solamente representa cerca del tres por ciento de la producción mundial. Actualmente el cacao proviene primordialmente de países africanos como Costa de Marfil, Ghana, Nigeria o Camerún, que en conjunto aglomeran casi el setenta por ciento de la producción mundial. Y esto ha generado nuevos retos, como la explotación de agricultores y trabajo infantil. Esto ha llevado a la creación de nuevas medidas necesarias para equilibrar la balanza de poder entre pequeños productores e industriales, como son iniciativas de comercio justo, hasta la creación de empresas responsables como Tony´s Chocolonely, fundada en Holanda en 2005 que promueve el chocolate 100% libre de esclavitud. Empresas como ésta suben el nivel del comercio justo del chocolate, promoviendo una industria libre de explotación, libre de esclavitud y libre de trabajo infantil, quizá de la forma más cuerda posible, liderando con el ejemplo y eliminado a intermediarios para comprar granos de cacao directamente de los pequeños productores, proporcionándoles un mucho mejor precio por su producción y empoderándolos para combatir la explotación.

pdf

José Ramón Castillo” by APEGA Sociedad Peruana de Gastronomía is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Por otro lado, el chef José Ramón Castillo es sin duda uno de los más grandes promotores y exponentes del chocolate mexicano contemporáneo, o como él mismo lo define, “la chocolatería evolutiva mexicana”. Josera, como lo conocen sus amigos, es reconocido como uno de los mejores chocolateros del mundo desde 2012 y ha recibido numerosos premios internacionales, que incluyen medallas de los International Chocolate Awards, y reconocimientos del gobierno mexicano y la UNESCO. En 2004 fundó la chocolatería Que Bo! ubicada en tres de los más representativos barrios de la ciudad de México y el centro histórico. Esta chocolatería ofrece a sus visitantes una experiencia culinaria multisensorial que cautiva desde la mirada, con colores brillantes y tonos inesperados, pasando por aromas inconfundibles y seductores de trufas y bombones para llegar a sabores intensos y sugerentes. La paleta de sabores de Josera es extensa y poco convencional, ofreciendo desde sabores cotidianos para los más tradicionales, pasando por gustos a naranja con sal de gusano, tamarindo, o hasta sabores a gansito y boing de mango (sabores difíciles de describir para los extranjeros, pero que llegan a tocar fibras de muchos mexicanos). Pero así también han seguido pauta algunas otras chocolateras en distintas ciudades de la ciudad de México. Algunas de ellas venden sus productos bajo etiquetas de orgánicos y se distribuyen en cadenas comerciales por el mundo. Ki’Xocolatl en Yucatán se reivindica como una de las pocas fábricas de chocolate en el mundo que trabaja directamente desde el grano de cacao. Fundada en 2002 por Stephanie Verbrugge y Mathieu Bre, dos Belgas radicados en la ciudad de Mérida Yucatán en México, comercializan barras de chocolate artesanal fino, como homenaje a la cultura maya y el cacao mexicano. El nombre de su empresa es una combinación de maya y náhuatl que enuncia literalmente, “delicioso chocolate”.

En un mundo globalizado, el mestizaje del chocolate es sin duda un símil del del pueblo mexicano. En México ya no se toma tan amargo, pero se sigue tomando especiado, ahora con un ligero toque a canela y clavo de olor y en el mundo se comienza a interpretar con sabores inexplorados, como el chile, la sal de mar o diversas especias. Dejó de ser una bebida aristocrática para volverse un placer de todos. Y se toma en las casas mexicanas acompañado de churros, pan dulce y otras delicias, pero también se toma en muchos otros lugares en incomparables formas. En México se antoja más cuando hace frío y es quizá por eso que se toma como complemento de deleites estacionales del invierno, como los buñuelos en navidad, la rosca de día de reyes o el pan de día de muertos. Pero también sabe bien en el verano en un Gelato cuando más hace calor. También en México se suele espesar con masa de maíz y se toma también con tamales, y se le llama champurrado. Pero en otros lugares se le mezcla con avellanas y otros ingredientes y se unta en pan. Lo que sí es que lo verdaderamente tradicional, ya sea en México o en el mundo, es tomarlo en familia, en todas sus formas y con todas sus comparsas. El chocolate es de México y es del mundo.

Fall 2020Volume XX, Number 1

Carlos Vargas is Professor of Finance and researcher at EGADE Business School, Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico, and Instructor Sustainable Finance and Investment at the Division of Continuing Education at Harvard University.

Carlos Vargas es Profesor de Finanzas e Investigador en el EGADE Business School del Tecnológico de Monterrey en Mexico e Instructor de Finanzas Sostenibles e Inversiones en la División de Educación Continua de la Universidad de Harvard. 

Related Articles

Chocolate: Editor’s Letter

Chocolate: Editor’s Letter

Is it a confession if someone confesses twice to the same thing?  Yes, dear readers, here it comes. I hate chocolate. For years, Visiting Scholars, returning students, loving friends have been bringing me chocolate from Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru…

El jardín pandémico

El jardín pandémico

English + Español
Imagine the tranquility of a garden. With the aroma of flowers mixed in with the buzzing of bees and the contrast of shady trees against the fierce Paraguayan sun. From the intimacy of a family garden in which daily ritual leads one to water the plants, gather up the dry leaves…

What’s in a Chocolate Boom?

What’s in a Chocolate Boom?

English + Español
Peru has a longstanding reputation for its quality cacao. In the past decade, it has also attracted attention as a craft chocolate hot-spot with a tantalizingly long list of must-try makers. Indeed, from 2015 through 2019, a boom of more than 50 craft chocolate…

Print Friendly, PDF & Email