Letter from Mexico: Hopes and Shadows

Learning Opportunities from the Covid-19 crisis

by | Sep 1, 2020

Signs.

In the last few years, I’ve immensely enjoyed walking around any city at all, from Shanghai to Cochabamba, without any fixed route. I walk for several hours to stumble on spaces of daily life, places that with a bit of luck one finds two or three blocks from a thoroughfare, or to simply encounter a hidden urban landmark nearby a tourist area. A tea store, a commemorative plaque explaining the historical uses of what is now a bank, a toy store that seems to be stocked with collectors’ items from estate sales, candy stores and fruit stands that probably have been in the same family for years. Every fortuitous encounter adds to the collection of memories that will compete against new discoveries.

This routine changed with social distancing. In the past few months, instead of exploring new places, I have tried to observe and record the different ads appearing in Aguascalientes, Mexico, the city where I live. Sales of masks and disinfectants, notices of partial closings (“all our services are for takeout only”), bargains and discounts for every type of product and service, and of course, the most worrisome signs, the “for rent” signs posted on closed businesses. Some of these signs make me think of entrepreneurs who recently opened a business, such as the last place we ate pizza together as a family, just before social distancing measures were imposed in Mexico.

Almost five months have passed in which every day we perceive at least one negative effect of the pandemic in our daily life. In a recently published piece in El País, I learned about how a nurse had to say goodbye to his five-year-old son before departing to the hospital one last time, although now as a patient. “Take care of your mom” was his recommendation. He died one hour after being admitted. As the same authors concluded, “any single death closely observed helps to deny any attempt to minimize the tragedy.” We see it in the newspapers and in the social media, but we also have close friends who have become sick with the virus or have lost their jobs or have relatives who have died. Since the first death officially reported on March 18, to this day, more than 60,000 Mexicans have died due to Covid-19, according to government reports. Some projections based on official statistics suggest that Mexico could reach up to 132,000 deaths by November 1, although researchers have found significant increases in out-of-hospital deaths, some of which will never be reported as  Covid-19 casualties. It is not a good time for many Mexican families.

Cathedral.

If I had to choose two words that describe the mood these days in Mexico, it would be “uncertainty” and “inequality.” In spite of trying every day to understand and anticipate the effects the pandemic has and will have in our country (particularly on educational systems and in general on the most marginalized population), we researchers and analysts do not manage to keep up with the virus, to advance in the complete understanding of the impact and dynamism with the same speed at which the pandemic is spreading.  The certainty which our research methods usually provide has been limited in the absence of reliable information, unexplainable social and personal behavior or the unfortunate tendency of certain political leaders in Latin America, who disparage experience or—even worse—scientific research.

Moreover, uncertainty increases because of those who contend publicly that the virus does not exist, because of those who insist that the virus will have little impact and that the worst has passed. The uncertainty also deepens because of those who have jumped to the conclusion that we are experiencing just a brief deviation from our path, that we will return to normality with the quickness to which we have become accustomed in this globalized life, so that in a few years we will remember only in a vague way the sanitary crisis we are experiencing, in the same way we look back on the pandemic provoked by the AH1N1 virus in 2009, or even the 2008 financial crisis.

If living with uncertainty is uncomfortable, the most unfortunate aspect of the pandemic in Mexico is its effect on its most vulnerable citizens. The preliminary information we have had access to reminds us that the effects of the pandemic are and will continue to be differentiated: for example, we know that seven out of every ten who have died from Covid-19 in Mexico did not finish elementary school. Unemployment is also more common among low-wage workers, and the digital divide is manifested with its greatest intensity in the schools serving the poorest: while 70% of non-indigenous primary schools reported at least one computer with access to the Internet, in the case of indigenous primary schools only 24% reported the same condition. We observe a huge gap between the mortality rates in public and private hospitals. Also, we learn from reports describing how people dying of Covid-19 at home because they do not trust the public health services. The pandemic we are living through is a cruel reminder of the injust inequalities that were already being observed in the country—access to healthy and education or income level—has been accentuated and if nothing is done, it will keep on growing.

Revolutionary convention.

Train station.

What we have been going through in the past months in Mexico is highly discouraging. Many would come to the conclusion that the collective efforts of years have been discarded and therefore, nothing can be done. But we can also think that what we are living through can transform us into more resilient citizens and communities, willing to cooperate and to contribute the serious economic problems that will result from this health crisis.  To speculate now about what will be the sense of change in our behaviors as a result of our personal experiences during the health crisis will continue to be one of the many uncertainties we have to deal with recently. But I believe that a cautious optimism should prevail, based on the behavior witnessed in Mexico after other disasters such as the 1985 and 2017 earthquakes, when many civilians rushed to help injured or trapped neighbors, whitout any consideration to the risk they were facing. Many pictures taken immediately after earthquakes happened proved how fast solidarity was present in the Mexican society.

Moreover, it is quite likely that since the inequality with which we coexist has become more visible, there is greater sensibility about the importance of resolving these inequities.  I believe that the pessimism that can result from living so many months with uncertainty and witnessing the inequitable effects of the health crisis, we face the hope that we can manage to reformulate discussions on social media to develop more informed and broader conversations and actions to help to resolve the multiple problems we share. I consider that the crisis we are experiencing will help to underline the importance of counting on leaders who design effective social policies, particularly those that promote access to equal learning opportunities. We are what we learn, and if we are witnessing today individual and collective behavior that is far from desirable in the challenging situation of this crisis, it is because the country has not taken advantage of the multiple opportunities for learning our educational system has created, whether it be to read or to learn to live in an orderly fashion with others. People using public transportation without wearing a mask, or people infected with Covid-19 refusing medical care to continue with their daily lives, are only examples of how our education system failed to develop social awareness and citizenship. Not to wear a mask can be considered a demonstration of ignorance or a political statement, but independently of how we perceive it, every person who does not wear a mask is a living example of the challenges our education system faces going forth.

Jesus F. Contreras.

If the political debate about education in Mexico in the midst of the pandemic does not have the intensity it should, the crisis has helped to underscore not only how ill-prepared we are to substitute online classes for in-person ones on a massive basis, but also on the importance of promoting lifelong learning. We need to guarantee learning as a continuous journey for all, beyond formal education and schools. We need to create conditions to rapidly teach adults and young populations how to face sanitary or economic crises by implementing information campaigns and reskilling programs, teaching health or citizenship education. Furthermore, we need to communicate the importance of informal education to create learning opportunities for all and develop new competencies to survive in a complex environment. Lifelong learning should be an opportunity to be better prepared for unexpected situations like the Covid-19 crisis.

Promoting lifelong learning will require reorganizing education systems, creating more opportunities for informal learning that adapt to contexts outside the traditional schooling (expanding opportunities to learn in museums, parks or community centers), for all types of populations (senior citizens, migrants, incarcerated populations, and school dropouts), at any time they need.

The criticisms I’ve seen during the pandemic about public education in Mexico are the expression of unsatisfied expectations about the tools that we have available to modify or reinforce behavior. In any case, I prefer to think that we criticize what is important to us, what we aim to improve and change.

Palacio de Gobierno Agradecimientos.

To better distribute learning opportunities for all will be one of the great post-pandemic challenges in Mexico and Latin America. To take advantage of the opportunities to educate everyone in and outside schools by adopting a life-long learning approach, will be one of the paths to reduce uncertainties and inequalities, but above all, permits us to hope that for the next global crisis our countries and communities will be more cohesive, better prepared, and resilient.

Una carta desde México

Luces y sombras: oportunidades para aprender de la crisis del Covid-19

Por Sergio Cárdenas

Signs.

En los últimos años he disfrutado mucho caminar por cualquier ciudad, desde Shanghai hasta Cochabamba, sin determinar una ruta fija. Camino varias horas para encontrar espacios de vida cotidiana, lugares que con algo de suerte encuentras a dos o tres calles de la avenida principal, o para encontrar algún hito urbano cerca de alguna zona turística. Una tienda de té, una placa conmemorativa explicando las etapas de un edificio que por ahora es una sucursal bancaria, una tienda de juguetes que parecen provenir de coleccionistas que fallecieron recientemente, dulcerías y negocios de venta de fruta que probablemente han sido atendidos por décadas por la misma familia. Cada encuentro fortuito agrega una memoria contra las que competirán nuevos hallazgos.

Esta rutina cambió por el distanciamiento social. En los últimos meses, en lugar de intentar encontrar nuevos lugares, he tratado de observar y recordar los distintos anuncios que van apareciendo en los negocios de la Ciudad de Aguascalientes, México, en donde vivo. Venta de cubrebocas y desinfectantes, avisos de cierres parciales (“todos nuestros servicios son para llevar”), ofertas y descuentos en cualquier tipo de productos y servicios, y por supuesto los letreros que más preocupan, los anuncios de “se renta”, fijados en locales cerrados. Varios de estos anuncios me hicieron recordar a emprendedores que recién abrían un negocio, como en el caso del último lugar en el que comimos una pizza en familia, poco antes de que iniciaran las medidas de distanciamiento social en México.

Han pasado casi cinco meses en los que cada día hemos sabido al menos de un efecto negativo de la pandemia en nuestra vida cotidiana. En un artículo publicado recientemente en “El país” supe por ejemplo de un enfermero que tuvo que despedirse de su hijo de cinco años, antes de partir hacia el hospital, aunque ahora como paciente. “Cuida mucho a tu mamá”, fue el mensaje para su hijo. Murió una hora después de ser admitido en el hospital. Como las mismas autoras concluyeron, “una sola muerte vista de cerca basta para […] desmentir cualquier intento de minimizar el impacto de la pandemia.”

Cathedral.

Lo vemos en los periódicos y en las redes sociales, pero también nos lo recuerda saber que amigos cercanos han enfermado, o que alguno de sus familiares ha fallecido víctima del Covid-19, o que han perdido su empleo. Desde que se reportó oficialmente en México la primera muerte debida al Covid-19 el 18 de marzo, de acuerdo con reportes gubernamentales hasta la fecha han fallecido más de 60 mil mexicanas y mexicanos por esta causa,. Algunas proyecciones basadas en datos oficiales disponibles sugieren que alcanzaremos hasta 132 mil muertes el 1º de noviembre de este año, aunque algunos investigadores han reportado incrementos en el número de muertes extra-hospitalarias, algunas de las cuales nunca serán relacionadas con el Covid-19. No es un buen momento para muchas familias mexicanas.

Si tuviera que elegir dos palabras que describan el ambiente que percibo estos días en México, serían incertidumbre e inequidad. A pesar de que cada día intentamos entender y anticipar los efectos que la pandemia tiene y tendrá en nuestro país (en particular en los sistemas educativos y en general sobre la población más vulnerable), los investigadores y analistas no logramos avanzar en la comprensión completa de su impacto y dinámica con la misma rapidez a la que se expande. La certidumbre que nos otorgaba recurrir a nuestros métodos de investigación se ha visto limitada ante la ausencia de información confiable, los comportamientos sociales y personales aparentemente inexplicables, o la desafortunada tendencia de algunos liderazgos políticos en América Latina, que menosprecian la experiencia—y peor aún—la investigación científica.

La incertidumbre crece además por quienes argumentan públicamente que el virus no existe, por quienes anuncian que su impacto será menor, o quienes insisten que ya hemos pasado lo peor de la crisis. También profundizan la incertidumbre quienes han concluido rápidamente que estamos solamente ante una breve desviación de una ruta, a la que volveremos con la rapidez a la que nos ha acostumbrado una vida globalizada, de manera que en unos años recordaremos vagamente la crisis sanitaria que vivimos, de la misma forma que ahora vemos como un suceso lejano la pandemia provocada por el virus AH1N1 en el año 2009, o  incluso la crisis financiera del año 2008.

Revolutionary convention.

Train station.

Pero si bien vivir con incertidumbre es una condición incómoda, el aspecto más desafortunado de la pandemia en México es que sus efectos son y serán más notorios entre la población más vulnerable. La información a la que hemos tenido acceso preliminarmente nos recuerda que los efectos de la pandemia son y serán diferenciados: por ejemplo, sabemos que  entre los fallecidos por Covid-19 en México, 7 de cada 10 no lograron terminar la educación básica.  También que el desempleo se ha manifestado con mayor frecuencia entre los trabajadores con ingresos más bajos, y que la brecha digital se manifestó con mayor intensidad en las escuelas públicas a las que asisten los estudiantes de menores recursos: en tanto un 70% de escuelas no indígenas reportó disponer de al menos una computadora con acceso a internet, solamente el 24% de las escuelas indígenas reportó lo mismo. Observamos también grandes brechas entre el porcentaje de mortalidad de los hospitales públicos y privados. También, que continúan falleciendo personas en casa por desconfianza hacia los servicios públicos de salud. La pandemia que vivimos ha sido un cruento recuerdo de que las desigualdades injustas que ya se observaban en el país se han acentuado — de acceso a la salud y educación, o de ingresos por ejemplo —,y que de no hacer algo seguirán creciendo.

Lo experimentado en los últimos meses en México es una fuente de desánimo. Muchos podríamos concluir que los esfuerzos colectivos de años se han tirado por la borda y que por lo tanto hay poco por hacer. Pero también podremos pensar que lo vivido podría convertirnos en ciudadanos y comunidades más resilientes y conscientes, dispuestas a cooperar y a contribuir para enfrentar los serios problemas económicos que resultarán de esta crisis sanitaria. Especular ahora sobre cuál será el sentido del cambio en nuestros comportamientos como consecuencia de las experiencias personales durante la crisis sanitaria, sin duda se sumaría a los múltiples ejemplos de divagación colectiva en los que nos hemos enfrascado recientemente. Pero a pesar de todo, creo que debe prevalecer un moderado optimismo derivado del comportamiento observado en México ante otros desastres, como en el caso de los terremotos de 1985 y del 2017, cuando muchas personas corrieron a ayudar a vecinos heridos o atrapados, sin considerar el riesgo que corrían personalmente. En muchas fotografías que se tomaron recién habían terminado los terremotos, se capturó lo rápido que se manifestó la solidaridad en la sociedad mexicana.

Aún más, es probable que al haberse hecho más visibles las inequidades con las que convivimos, exista una mayor sensibilización sobre la importancia de resolverlas. Creo que al pesimismo que puede resultar de vivir tantos meses en la incertidumbre y de observar los efectos desiguales de la crisis sanitaria, se enfrenta la esperanza de que logremos rebasar las discusiones en redes sociales para desarrollar conversaciones y acciones más amplias e informadas, que ayuden a resolver los múltiples problemas que compartimos. Considero que la crisis que vivimos ayudará a resaltar también la importancia que adquiere contar con liderazgos que diseñen políticas sociales efectivas, particularmente las que promueven el acceso a oportunidades de aprendizaje. Somos lo que aprendemos, y si hoy observamos tantos comportamientos individuales y colectivos alejados de lo deseable en un entorno de crisis, es porque como país hemos desaprovechado las múltiples oportunidades de aprendizaje que nuestro sistema educativo ha creado, sean para aprender a leer o para aprender a vivir ordenadamente con otros. La gente que aborda transporte público sin usar un cubrebocas, o los contagiados de Covid-19 que se rehúsan a recibir atención médica para seguir con sus actividades cotidianas, son ejemplos de cómo nuestro sistema educativo falló al no desarrollar sensibilidad social  y ciudadanía. No usar un cubrebocas puede ser considerado como una muestra de ignorancia, o como un pronunciamiento político, pero independientemente a nuestra valoración, cada persona que no lo usa es un ejemplo vivo de los retos que nuestro sistema educativo tiene por delante.

Jesus F. Contreras.

Si bien el debate público sobre la educación en México en plena pandemia no tiene todavía la intensidad que debería, ha ayudado a resaltar no solamente lo poco preparados que estábamos para sustituir clases presenciales de manera masiva, sino la importancia que adquiere que adoptemos enfoques que promuevan aprendizajes a lo largo de la vida. Necesitamos garantizar que el aprendizaje sea una actividad permanente para todos, más allá de lo la educación formal y de las escuelas. Necesitamos crear condiciones para enseñar oportunamente a adultos y jóvenes cómo enfrentar crisis sanitarias y económicas, implementando campañas informativas y programas de recualificación, a la par de enseñarles cómo cuidar su salud y desarrollar ciudadanía. Aún más, necesitamos comunicar la importancia de la educación informal y crear oportunidades de aprendizajes para todos, que permitan adquirir nuevas competencias para sobrevivir en ambientes cada vez más complejos. El aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida debería ser una oportunidad para estar mejor preparados para situaciones inesperadas, como en el caso de la crisis generada por el Covid-19.

Esta reorientación ayudará no solamente a reorganizar el funcionamiento de los sistemas de educación formal y escolarizados, sino también a crear oportunidades de aprendizaje informal que se adapten a condiciones y contextos fuera de la escuela tradicional (como museos, parques o centros comunitarios), y para todo tipo de poblaciones (adultos mayores, migrantes, personas en situación de cárcel y las que abandonaron la escuela), en cualquier momento en que lo requieran.

Considero que las críticas que he observado hacia la educación pública en México durante la pandemia, son una expresión de las expectativas insatisfechas hacia la eficacia de las herramientas de las que disponemos para modificar o continuar comportamientos. En todo caso, prefiero considerar que criticamos lo que nos importa, lo que pensamos puede mejorar y cambiar.

Palacio de Gobierno Agradecimientos.

Distribuir de mejor forma oportunidades de aprendizaje erá uno de los grandes retos post-pandemia en México y en América Latina. Aprovechar adecuadamente las oportunidades para educar a todos dentro y fuera de las escuelas, será una de las rutas que nos ayudará a reducir incertidumbres e inequidades, pero sobre todo, nos permitirá aspirar a que la siguiente crisis global encuentre comunidades mejor preparadas, más integradas y resilientes.

Sergio Cárdenas is a professor at the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas in Mexico and the 2020-2021 Antonio Madero Visiting Scholar at DRCLAS. His research focuses on educational inequalities and lifelong learning policies.

Sergio Cárdenas es profesor investigador en el Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas en Mexico, e Investigador Visitante “Antonio Madero” para el período 2020-2021 en el DRCLAS. Su investigación se concentra en el análisis de desigualdades educativas y en las políticas de aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida.

Related Articles

The Venezuelan Gold Rush

The Venezuelan Gold Rush

English + Español
Control by armed criminal groups, sexual abuse of women and children, slavery, child labor, mercury poisoning, malaria outbreaks, malnutrition, torture, forced disappearances, forced

Women Farmworkers and Gardening

Women Farmworkers and Gardening

English + Español
It’s 6 a.m. in Immokalee, Florida, and the roosters all over town are singing in cacophony, echoing from all directions in the dark. Farmworkers gather in small groups in the large parking

Print Friendly, PDF & Email